At Agilité, we’re hyper aware of the knock-on impact construction can have on the oceans and our planet’s water, which isn’t something that can be left unchecked. That’s why we’re proactively working towards reducing those negative impacts in our own operations and services. 

What’s more, we’ve also committed to donating 2% of our profits each year to help projects which we believe can help the building industry be more sustainable.

So, to celebrate all things socially conscious, help share tips for smarter environmental thinking, and remind each other just how much our impact matters, we’re inviting friends of the business to take part in our quickfire Q&A.

Next up, it’s Hannah Bellamy, UK managing director of Agilité beneficiary, charity: water…

Catching up with Hannah Bellamy, of charity: water

Where do you fit into the environmental sector? Tell us a little bit about your role at charity: water…

My role is to bring the biggest clean water charity in the US over to the United Kingdom. Our mission is to ensure every person on the planet has access to clean, sanitary water. We support rural communities in countries that are low on the UN’s Human Development Index. In many locations, people already face a changing climate, so providing sustainable access to safe drinking water is one small change we can make to help remote communities adapt and be more resilient in the future.

 

What made you decide to join charity: water? 

The level of transparency. Everyone who donates knows what their money is being used for — whether it’s into sustainable clean water projects or an investment into our team and operations. 

 

What song perfectly sums up your working day? 

Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger by Daft Punk. Not because I succeed in doing things better each day, but because, as a whole organisation, we really try. The global water crisis isn’t something we can tackle with complacency. We want to help more people, faster, and with better technology, for long-term change. It also makes for a great work soundtrack. 

 

Tell us a fact about water that you think people need to know:

Globally, a lack of clean water and sanitation is the leading killer of children under five. It’s also a problem we know how to fix. We just need more people to care, to believe, and to invest. 

 

Which sector do you think could achieve significant social progress this year?

The renewable energy sector has the potential to achieve significant social progress. With an increasing global awareness of climate change and the need to transition to sustainable energy sources, advancements in renewable energy technologies and infrastructure can lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and a more environmentally-friendly future.

 

What do you wish you’d known about the environment, as a child?

How lucky I was to have parents who shared their love for — and peace in — nature with me and my sisters. 

 

What’s the single biggest threat to mankind, in your opinion?

Thinking that any one person - especially one who isn’t a scientist or peer-reviewed - can answer this question. 

 

If you were prime minister for the day, what’s the one thing you’d implement? 

I wish the political narrative wasn’t about short-term change and promoting individual heroes. True change takes hard work and collective action. I would launch a hearts and minds campaign, highlighting that 1 in 11 people around the world don’t have access to clean water, and that it’s an issue we know how to fix if we work together.

 

Complete the sentence – in 100 years’ time, I hope… 

…every single person has clean, safe water to drink.

As we approach the end of the summer period, we took a look back at what our various commercial interiors teams have been getting up to around the globe. 

 

On the road with Agilité in August - Work in progress for a global financial management firm

Work in progress for a global financial management firm 

Take a sneak peek behind the scenes of this open plan fit-out, currently being overseen and managed by our Italian team. 

We can’t wait to see the finished product. 

 

On the road with Agilité in August - Keeping the movement going with Lids in Amsterdam

Keeping the movement going with Lids in Amsterdam 

It was great to see another completion for our sports retailer client, Lids, this time in Amsterdam. 

Sports fans will be able to browse displays of the latest merchandise and clothing in the Dutch capital. 

 

On the road with Agilité in August - Lululemon Amsterdam

Lululemon Amsterdam 

There was no stopping the Amsterdam team in August, as they also completed the outfitting of Lululemon’s latest store.  

Congratulations and job well done to all involved. 

 

On the road with Agilité in August - Meet the new UK country head for Agilité — Daniel Hunt

Meet the new UK country head for Agilité — Daniel Hunt 

As a part of our ever-growing international team, each month we celebrate a colleague and put them in the hotseat to get to know them a little better. 

In August, the focus was on our newly-appointed UK country head, Daniel Hunt, as he shared what his new role entails, who his dream client would be, and his favourite places in the world to have worked. 

Get to know Daniel, here. 

 

And with that, the last quarter of the year upon us, and we look forward to what’s next in store for the team. 

To keep up to date with our colleagues and projects, follow us on LinkedIn and Instagram. 

We’ve worked hard to recruit some of the most experienced global talent from the world of design, build, construction, and project management. 

And, each month, we put one of our colleagues in the spotlight so you can learn a little more about their role…

Next up, it’s our recently appointed UK country head, Daniel Hunt.

1. Describe your job in one paragraph

As the newly instated UK country head, I am responsible for growing the UK business and establishing a sustainable structure made up of happy and ambitious Agilité employees!

2. Which one word would colleagues use to describe you? 

It’s early days, but I would like to think they already see me as a dedicated member of the team. 

3. Why do you think Agilité stands out from competitors? 

Its unwavering commitment to doing the right thing — whether through B Corp initiatives or the way we treat clients, colleagues, and partners. 

4. You have worked in some amazing places around the world. Which has been your favourite?

It’s hard to pick, so some special places would be Monte Carlo, Skorpios Island in Greece, Tokyo, Abu Dhabi. If pressed for a favourite, it would have to be Sipan Island, northwest of Dubrovnik. 

5. What’s your biggest career highlight to date? 

Maintaining a happy team that wants to progress and develop. Watching younger colleagues rise through the business to take on more senior roles has always given me particular satisfaction.

6. The phone rings and it’s your dream client… who is it? 

Liverpool Football Club calling to discuss a new fitout of the Kop!

7. What key piece of advice would you give to a client planning a commercial interiors project?

Allow yourself time to do the due diligence. 

8. When you’re not at work, where are we most likely to find you? 

Carshalton Athletic Football Club, watching my two girls play or train.

9. What’s next for Agilité? 

A number of exciting new projects and further growth opportunities. 

10. As an organisation with sustainability at its heart, Agilité is dedicated to minimising environmental impact within the construction industry. What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the sector, and how do you think we can rectify it?

There has been lots of environmental progress in the industry recently, however, some key challenges lie ahead. 

Increasingly demanding legislation around energy efficiency in the UK will have a dramatic effect on existing office space and how usage is controlled in ageing buildings. This will hopefully have a positive impact, not only on energy consumption when the building is in use, but also the way spaces are optimised to perform as efficiently as possible. Agilité’s teams will be required to speak from an informed position on these matters, so high level training should be put in place to address this subject with authority.

And that’s a wrap — July is over and what a month it's been. 

With projects won, others approaching completion, and everything in between, there’s a lot to catch up on from the past few weeks… 

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

The picture of work/life balance for the Italian team  

Our colleagues in Milan gathered under the summer sun to celebrate a series of successful project completions and enjoy a stand up comedy performance at WeWork.  

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

Transforming an event space for a global sports retailer

The team recently wrapped up on this technical project for a well-known American athletic brand. The event presented a few challenges, but our colleagues worked hard for a fantastic end result. Well done all round.  

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

It’s Stephen Murray’s turn in the team spotlight

Every month, we celebrate our international team by inviting a colleague into the hotseat to get to know them a little better. 

July’s focus was Germany-based construction manager, Stephen Murray, as he shared a favourite place he’s worked, how he spends his free time, and a career highlight to date. 

Get to know more about Stephen, here. 

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

Handing over the keys to a luxury car brand 

Congratulations to everyone involved with the completion of the interior outfitting for a well-known car brand in France. 

A beautiful project for a pioneering brand.  

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

Redefining spaces in… Milan

The latest announcement in a series of project wins is a 650 sqm showroom in Milan, Italy. The Agilité team is very excited to get stuck in and begin work in the vibrant capital city. 

Stay tuned for more updates. 

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

Sheltering from the showers

Some of our Italian colleagues joined the team for a social gathering in France, and not even the rain could dampen their spirits.  

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

Celebrating seventeen years of Associazione Real Estate Ladies (AREL) 

Maria Luisa Daglia, country head (Italy), had the privilege of attending the esteemed birthday event at the duo of extraordinary venues Villa Mirabello in Milan and the rooftop of the Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas in Rome. 

See all the highlights 

 

On the Road with Agilité in July

A new home for Hogan Lovells 

Congratulations to the Agilité team for work on the recently-completed Hogan Lovells project in Brussels. 

The modern 2,000 m2 office in the Belgian capital is all set to house around 44 employees. We’re delighted with the final result. 

 

That’s a wrap, and with July coming to an end, we look forward to what August has to offer. 

To keep up to date with our team and projects, follow us on LinkedIn and Instagram. 

As we continue to bolster Agilité's global footprint across France, Germany, Luxembourg, Italy, and the UK, we are delighted to announce our newest appointment.

To find out more about our recruit, read the official press release below.

International commercial interiors specialist Agilité has marked its continued growth with the appointment of a new country head for the UK. The news comes in line with the company surpassing its fifth year of trading, with 2023 turnover expected to exceed €50 million.

Daniel Hunt will be stepping into the role of country head for Agilité’s UK division. As a former regional director of multi-disciplinary construction company Aecom, Daniel brings decades of industry experience working in the retail, leisure, commercial fit-out, public, and residential sectors, and has a proven track record of delivering successful budgetary control, project management, and quantity surveying services for clients across the country.

This recent appointment reflects Agilité’s commitment to bolstering its already established UK presence. Daniel will play a leading role in achieving these goals, where he will be responsible for cementing team structures, and managing UK delivery targets in a way that mirrors the Paris-headquarters’ operations overseas.

With other existing bases in Luxembourg, Milan, and Berlin, as well as a planned expansion into the US, the London evolution comes as Agilité chalks up its 235th project since its inception in January 2018 – delivered across 11 countries.

Agilité’s burgeoning client portfolio includes brands such as Lids/NBA, END., Lululemon, Big Mamma, Savills, LVMH, Booking.com, Deutsche Börse, and The Instant Group, as well as several major multinationals in the tech and finance sectors.

Enhancing the UK base marks a natural progression in Agilité’s international growth — offering a myriad of valuable opportunities to the organisation as it looks to secure new contracts, build new relationships, and continue to grow its diverse client portfolio in the English capital.

Commenting on his new role, Daniel said: “I’m delighted to be joining Agilité as the country head for the UK. I’ve always admired the business for its commitment to sustainability and an innate ability to deliver complex and dynamic projects — so it’s really exciting to be playing such a central role in expanding the organisation in the UK.

“Joining the UK business for the next stage of its evolution will help us take advantage of the numerous opportunities on offer and begin work on new projects for world-leading brands. I look forward to meeting the rest of the team and building upon what is already an innovative, pioneering organisation.”

Speaking on the announcement, Agilité’s founder and MD, Neil Coales, added: "Our vision has always remained the same — an unwavering pursuit of quality to support our clients’ growth plans. Part of this strategy has seen us establish a truly pan-European business that is operational in multiple locations for a range of customers — providing flexible and agile end-to-end service to meet the varying demands of our clients’ business needs.

“So, as we push ahead on our next chapter of success, it’s important that we focus on identifying locations and opportunities that best support our clients, and the strong supply chains we’re establishing along the way.

“I am delighted with Daniel’s appointment,” Neil continued. “And the bolstered UK base means we’ll have the means and resources to compete with other notable firms in our space.”The augmentation of the European company — which provides office, retail, and hospitality construction and fit-out work across the continent — follows 30% year-on-year growth and an increased company-wide headcount of 75.

With the first half of 2023 coming to a close, June brought us some summer sun and full schedules. 

Take a look at some of the things that we’ve been up to over the past month…

 

Agilité visit McArthur Glen

Lights, camera, Agilité

It was time to put some of the Agilité team in front of the camera, as they journeyed to client McArthurGlen’s site in Dounais for a filming project — with the help of TimeLapse Go.

Operations director, Galia Minkara, project manager, Hani Benbrahim, and assistant project manager, Michale Nassar were in attendance along with construction managers Sébastien Benoit, and Aurore Lossier, all shared their experiences in working on the multi-space transformation project.

We’re very excited to see the final result!

Find out more about our other projects, here.

 

Meet Fabio Duarte, accounting assistant for Agilité

Meet Fabio Duarte, accounting assistant for Agilité

With an international team at Agilité, we like to give one of our colleagues the chance to introduce themselves.

Last month, it was accounting assistant, Fabio Duarte’s, turn to step into the spotlight — talking about his dream client, what he does outside of work, and the biggest challenge he thinks the construction industry is facing.

Get to know more about Fabio, here.

 

Celebrating World Environment Day with Agilité's new ESG manifesto

Celebrating World Environment Day with our new ESG manifesto

June 5 saw the annual celebration of World Environment Day, with this year’s theme being #BeatPlasticPollution.

Here at Agilité, we recognise that the construction industry needs to evolve to integrate more sustainable working practices.

Download our new manifesto, that shows our commitment to sustainability and environmental, social and governance (ESG), now.

 

What an exciting month! We can’t wait to see what’s to come in the next six months. To keep up to date with our team and projects, follow us on LinkedIn and Instagram.

 At Agilité, we’re hyper-aware of the knock-on impact construction can have on the oceans and our planet’s water, which isn’t something that can be left unchecked. That’s why we’re proactively working towards reducing those negative impacts in our own operations and services. What’s more, we’ve also committed to donating 3% of our profits each year to help projects which we believe can help the building industry be more sustainable.

So, to celebrate all-things-socially-conscious, share tips for smarter environmental thinking, and remind each other just how much our impact matters, we’re inviting colleagues and friends of the business to take part in our quickfire Q&A. 

First up, it’s Dominic Wodehouse PhD, executive director of Agilité beneficiary, Mangrove Action Project (MAP).

Where do you fit into the environmental sector?

MAP is a small non-profit organisation, focused on mangrove education and restoration training. We run workshops around the world in a bid to improve the outcomes of restorationists — in terms of mangrove survivorship and biodiversity — as well as working with schools to ensure the next generations conserve these precious ecosystems.

Surprisingly, despite the increased interest in ecosystems that sequester and store carbon, the volume of published mangrove science, and the collective experience from conservation projects around the world, survivorship of such planting projects is very low.

To combat this, we demonstrate the necessary biology, ecology, and restoration process and take attendees into the field so they can really understand the intricacies of the ecosystem. It’s complicated — as Facebook would say — and more complex than terrestrial forests.

We are delighted that Agilité has kindly opted to support our work, as well as granted me the opportunity to present to the team in Paris in February, to explain what we do in greater detail.

MAP presentation Paris

From left: Ahmed Senhaji, Neil Coales, Dominic Wodehouse, Carl Elia, Zeid Shehadeh, Vincent Joullié, and Morvan Dishaw

Tell us a little bit about your role at Mangrove Action Project…

I have the honour of running the best mangrove restoration training team in the world! My role includes developing the NGO’s strategy, leading the pitching to — and interaction with — funders, leading the restoration workshop training, carrying the bags, taking far too many photos at each workshop, and occasionally pulling people’s shoes out of mangrove mud.

What made you decide to join Mangrove Action Project?

Prior to life at MAP, I spent 10 years in advertising. I was a decade too late, and it felt like a humourless, political sweatshop. Leaving that industry was an easy decision. Working out what to do next, not so much.

A previous love of trees took me into arboriculture in the UK, as a way into tree-based conservation. Plenty of reading and an MSc revealed the ecosystem that was most interesting was mangroves. I began volunteering for MAP in Trang, in southern Thailand in 2005, and became hooked by a technical conference on the same trip. In a speech, Robin Lewis, the legendarily mangrove restorationist, said the mission required ‘informed supervision in the middle’ between the academics and ground teams, and from then I could see where the rest of my life was heading. A PhD and lots of restoration teaching later, I’m MAP’s executive director — how bonkers is that?!

What song perfectly sums up your working day?

Hard day’s night by The Beatles. Most of my days start around 9am and finish the following day.

Tell us a fact about mangroves that you think people need to know:

Facing a big incoming storm, they can literally make the difference between life and death for coastal communities. Chiefly because inhabitants had previously cleared their mangroves for rice farming, 110,000 people died and another 30,000 went ‘missing’ when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar in 2008. Those protected by mangroves largely survived.

Which sector do you think could achieve significant social progress this year?

I’m hoping the funding sector could change their approach to working with NGOs this year and move away from burying said organisations in reporting requirements and budget line restrictions, and instead letting trustworthy bodies get on with what they do best.

Secondly, I’m hoping that governments will realise the need for co-ordinated policy and activity. There’s no point an environment department trying to protect an ecosystem when another —often more powerful — part of the same government decides on a change of land use for that same area.

Thirdly, that groups and companies that engage in environmental work realise that often the solution is social and holistic, not technical. For example, rural projects often fail because the community leadership functions poorly. People have limited livelihood options because literacy is much more of a problem than the statistics would have us believe. Many long-term problems in poor areas can be solved by much better schooling for girls, and properly training the teachers themselves. Building a school is a simple task, but can sometimes miss the point. Developing a mechanism that ensures well-qualified educators turn up at the school every day and teach, rather than offer private lessons for more money, is difficult.

What role do you think technology can play in creating a more sustainable future?

Technology can help us to deal with the long time-lag of CO2 reduction. Even if we reduce output dramatically now, it will still take decades for the levels in the atmosphere to decrease.

What do you wish you’d known about the environment, as a child?

I wish I had known about the impact of all the stupid stuff we did — lead in petrol, DDT, pesticides, the rush into shrimp farming in the mangroves, encouraging people into cars — and been able to do something about it.

What’s the single biggest threat to mankind, in your opinion?

Positive feedback loops building each other, such as the thawing of the permafrost in northern Russia or the release of clathrate methane from the seabed. How these feedback loops interact is poorly understood.

Or Trump in 2024.

If you were country leader for the day, what’s the one thing you’d implement?

Sign an executive order that automatically bans anyone from politics who wants to be a politician – they are clearly in it for the wrong reasons!

What advice would you give to someone who wants to get involved in environmental activism or advocacy?

Develop — and follow — your passion. Don’t try to cover everything but engage in an area you can be knowledgeable and enthusiastic about. Keep reading. Link up with groups in that topic – you’ll be amazed by the different ways you can help. Intern where you can. Develop the skillsets that make you valuable to organisations within your area. Master’s yes, but don’t assume you need a PhD. Lots of NGOs are run poorly and what senior managers need is an MBA in NGO management, not a research degree. Be prepared to live poor and skip retirement. Learn to network like Henry Kissinger and present like a TEDTalk hero.

Complete the sentence – in 100 years’ time, I hope…

I hope that we are not sitting in front row seats for the sixth extinction.

One core belief that we stand by at Agilité is that we are only as good as our supply chain. But what does this mean in practice? Every decision we make as business owners has some impact on the environment – whether it’s direct, such as greenhouse gas emissions, or indirectly through our suppliers. 

 

Why businesses may be cautious about sustainability  

We all want to do better for the planet. But one of the biggest objections to making sustainable change comes from lack of knowledge. How can we measure the impact of our carbon-cutting initiatives, and where does the supply chain fit into this? 

A great place to start is by reviewing our suppliers. We need to look for credentials – real standards as set by organisations such as the Global Reporting Initiative – as well as solid evidence of change-making. This will require some degree of research and transparency between suppliers, for example: 

 

Why we should all prioritise sustainability in the supply chain 

Moving to a sustainable supply chain affects every facet of the business. In our latest report, Conscious Construction: Building a Sustainable Supply Chain, we discuss the wide-reaching benefits. 

 

1. The climate imperative 

At present, the construction industry is one of the biggest contributors to climate change – responsible for 40% of water pollution and 50% of landfill waste respectively. By reducing our climate impact, we can create a more sustainable future, while also improving our bottom lines.  

Alexandre Loisy, pre-construction director at Agilité, says: “Reducing your business’ environmental impact can lead to huge savings. Not only will it reduce waste; it will also boost efficiency and create a positive culture within the organisation.” 

 

2. Legislative concerns 

An ESG conscience is not only a “nice-to-have”, says Cintia Procaci, founder of eco-conscious consultancy A Beautiful Green. Legislative changes can impact risk management, so it is important for companies to have full transparency over their supply chain. 

Likewise, she notes, pressure from other organisations such as the EU will put the spotlight on reporting. “One EU proposal will demand that multinationals have clarity around human rights in the value chain, whilst another asks companies to produce non-financial reports that detail their sustainability efforts.” 

 

3. Winning new business 

Corporate social responsibility is now becoming aligned with other value-adding factors such as price or reliability. Procaci adds: “Ethically, stakeholders are becoming increasingly educated around the sustainable issues facing the global population.” 

This means that businesses are increasingly incentivised to work with others who share their values. As Loisy notes, making our green agenda known can help to establish strong professional connections. Accreditations such as ISO 14001 only serve to strengthen this further.

 

4. Diversifying the supply chain 

The events of 2020 and beyond have wreaked untold havoc on supply chains throughout the world. From a pandemic to conflict, stakeholders are having to source new means to deliver their products on time.  

A sustainable supply chain is a diversified one – working with multiple suppliers to reduce mileage and deliver on schedule. This prevents downtime and protects companies’ reputations. 

 

5. Improving company culture 

A sustainable supply chain helps us to mitigate risk. These risks are not only about buying and selling, but about the workforce itself. Just as our clients are looking to work with more socially conscious businesses, so too are colleagues.  

A global millennial survey by Deloitte found that 63% of workers in this age range donate to charities, while 43% volunteer. By weaving sustainability into the company culture, we can attract top talent. 

 

Is a sustainable supply chain on your to-do list for 2023? 

Prioritising corporate social responsibility will have far-reaching, long-term benefits for your business. But how can we start to make the change? Our report, Conscious Construction: Building a Sustainable Supply Chain, offers actionable tips and insights to help you get started. 

 

Download the free report here >

As the global population continues to work towards building a more sustainable future for our planet, there has never been a more important time for those in construction to understand the impact their work is having on the both the environment and the societies in which we operate – so understanding your carbon footprint is essential.

In its simplest form, a carbon footprint refers to the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions caused by operations – including the construction process, transportation, and materials used. And, there are several common issues on construction sites in relation to sustainability — including energy consumption, waste generation, and material sourcing — but solving them doesn’t have to cost the earth.

At Agilité, we’re in the process of calculating how much carbon we’re emitting on our sites — through the use of materials, energy, and the waste we produce — to benchmark where we are, and how we could offset that amount through other projects, to achieve carbon neutrality.

Only by understanding, and therefore trying to proactively reduce our usage and reliance on some of the main producers of greenhouse gases — such as sand, water, other raw materials, as well as the high levels of power needed to operate a site — can we start to evaluate renewable and more sustainable alternatives.

For example, energy consumption can be reduced by swapping to energy-efficient lighting and HVAC systems during construction, as well as using renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, to power the site.

As construction sites also generate a lot of waste — including generic debris, product packaging, and other materials — proper waste management practices, such as separation of waste, composting, reuse and recycling, can help reduce surpluses.

We know that sourcing sustainable materials can be challenging, particularly if it’s not a part of the client’s budget (read more in our ‘sustainable supply chain guide’) but it’s essential to reduce the negative impact of construction on the planet. Where possible, though, it’s important to use recycled or locally-sourced products — and choose materials that have a lower environmental impact.

That’s why understanding your carbon footprint and implementing sustainable practices on construction sites is essential for reducing the harmful impact of construction on the planet.

It’s no secret that the construction industry is largely responsible for the carbon footprint of UK businesses. In April 2022, sobering statistics from Bimhow revealed that the industry contributes to: 

Of course, it doesn’t have to be this way – and the onus is on us as business owners to make better decisions. Much of this comes down to the supply chain, leveraging transparency and visibility, and working with sustainable suppliers. 

It’s a topic that we discuss at length in our latest report, Conscious Construction: Building a Sustainable Supply Chain. Here, our senior project manager Antonio Borges shares his tips for sustainable store concepts and materials – without breaking the bank. 

 

Power down

Construction projects aren’t running 24 hours a day – and neither should your power. Powering down temporary installations such as lighting can save up to 5 tonnes of CO2 emissions per year. 

 

Source sustainable materials 

Working with recycled or recyclable materials reduces our reliance on new production. Educating yourself on factors like the four main types of plastics and looking for credentials such as ISO 14001 will guide decision-making. 

 

Seek robust solutions 

Not only should materials be sustainable; they should be robust. Consider the long-term impact of the materials you use. For example, investing in hardwood flooring once will have less impact than continually reflooring a retail store. 

 

Plan your project space wisely 

The space itself should be designed efficiently, with zones to encourage free movement rather than staying in one place. This will help to disperse energy equally, and without waste. 

 

Encourage a lean approach 

When signing up to work with any new supplier, always enquire about lean materials. A value engineering approach will help to use fewer materials without compromising the overall look and feel of the project. 

 

Reduce the impact of your deliveries 

By grouping deliveries, you can save on journeys and reduce emissions. Bulk ordering materials to the site will decrease mileage, as will working with local suppliers. According to the World Economic Forum, last-mile deliveries will contribute to some of the largest increases in carbon emissions by 2030. 

 

Think about reusing space 

Demolition is a huge factor in the footprint of the construction sector – contributing 0.004 to 0.1kg of CO2 per kg of concrete material. Reusing elements in an existing space will lessen our reliance on demolition.  

 

Use smart technology to reduce energy consumption 

Smart control systems offer a holistic dashboard of analytics to identify where energy is being used – and crucially, where it’s being wasted. Keeping an eye on these analytics will help to drive costs down and maintain lower emissions. 

 

Lower temperatures for better energy efficiencies 

Lower temperatures work wonders for energy consumption. The UK alone has the potential to save 1.18 million tonnes of CO2 per year by turning down thermostats by just 1C.  

 

Use local suppliers 

With transportation accounting for 14% of all greenhouse gas emissions, it pays to use local suppliers. Once again, optimising deliveries in bulk will reduce mileage, while it’s also advisable to work with greener logistics teams where possible. 

 

Find out more in our latest report 

Creating a more sustainable supply chain doesn’t need to be overwhelming. Even making the smallest changes can have a huge impact – it all starts with education. For more insights, download our free copy of Conscious Construction: Building a Sustainable Supply Chain today.

 

Download your free guide > 

Cormac O’Sullivan is no stranger to the wider Agilité family, having been a part of our team since 2019 – when he joined as a project manager. Following his recent promotions to operations director (Rest of Europe), we caught up with him, to find out more about his new role – and his ambitions.

Under his new remit, Cormac assumes ultimate responsibility for any of our deliveries outside of France and Italy – which are led by Galia Minkara and Maria Luisa Daglia, respectively. Day-to-day, he will oversee our international commercial interiors projects, taking them from A-Z and ensuring our teams, partners, and suppliers are set up to do just that. 

Having been an integral part of the business for the past four years, Cormac’s progression has been in tandem with Agilité’s own exponential growth. A civil engineer by training, and with a background in Cat A/B corporate real estate fit out projects, Cormac is our go-to for the ‘big’ projects that land at our door. 

Challenges he enjoys because of the diversity within the team: “Bigger projects equate to more people and therefore a more diverse crew. You’re meeting individuals from all walks of life, with differing experiences and opinions – allowing for a truly collaborative build,” explained Cormac.

So, without further ado, we thought we’d put Cormac in the hotseat, and find out a little more about him... 

 

Which one word would colleagues use to describe you? 

Direct - I like to get to the point!

 

Why do you think Agilité stands out from competitors? 

We get things done. By understanding our clients, we know how to get them from point A to point B – on a hassle-free journey. No matter what happens on a project, we’ll find a way to facilitate it, whatever it takes.

 

You have worked in some amazing places around the world. Which has been your favourite? 

San Fransisco. It was prior to working with Agilité, and I was doing groundwork in civil engineering. If I had to choose somewhere in Europe it would have to be Lisbon – and project-wise, I’d probably say Booking.com, Kirkland and Ellis, and many of the confidential tech projects we work on.

 

What’s your biggest career highlight to date? 

Having my own career follow Agilité’s growth trajectory – the genesis of it feels pretty special. 

 

The phone rings and it’s your dream client… who is it? 

Patagonia 

 

What key piece of advice would you give to a client planning a commercial interiors project? 

Proper due diligence is key – on the building or the space you’re taking – and underpins the success of the entire delivery, so don’t rush it!

 

When you’re not at work, where are we most likely to find you? 

I live in Bordeaux, France, so much of my downtime is spent on the beach or in the water, surfing. 

 

What’s next for Agilité?  

That would be telling! What I can say, is that you can expect to see us exploring new opportunities and new geographies – both in and outside of Europe.

 

As an organisation with sustainability at its heart, Agilité  is dedicated to minimising environmental impact within the construction industry. What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the sector, and how do you think we can rectify it?  

That is such a hard question, because there are so many wider economic factors at play – particularly now. As an industry, we need to phase out old methods of choosing products, and manufacturers and designers should seek to collaborate to offer more sustainable options.

Those involved in planning a project would use ‘greener’ options if they knew where to find them, but if such a solution isn’t obviously on the market, people won’t go looking for it. I do believe that clients would buy into them, if they were readily available. 

We’ve worked hard to recruit some of the most experienced global talent from the world of design, build, construction, and project management.
Each month, we put one of our colleagues in the spotlight so you can learn a little more about their role.
Next up, it’s our new project manager, Marcello Battaglia…

 

1.         Tell us what attracted you to Agilité Solutions?

As a native Italian and having lived and worked in Dubai for over four years, I felt myself being drawn back to Italy, where the construction industry continues to grow and thrive. The role at Agilité presented an opportunity to hone my skills and tackle a new challenge. Plus, I really enjoyed speaking to human resources manager, Naomi Felix, during my initial interview, which further cemented my desire to become a part of the team.

 

2.        Can you share a little bit about your background?

I have over 10 years of experience in the construction industry and a master’s degree in architecture. Having held positions in countries all over the world — including U.A.E, Switzerland, Iran, India, and the UK — I’ve worked with a number of high-profile brands which has allowed me to strengthen both my management skills as well as design, construction, and architectural knowledge.


3.       Describe a defining moment in your career.

There are lots of moments! One of the most significant was when I went to work in Dubai — it was a completely different way of working, living, and interacting with others, so I was required to adapt very quickly.

 

4.         What does your new role involve?

In a nutshell, I will be overseeing Agilité’s ongoing commercial interiors projects from start to finish.

 

5.    What are you most looking forward to doing?

Developing my knowledge of the organisation, travelling to, and working in numerous countries across Europe, and maintaining total oversight throughout whole developments.

 

6.      The phone rings and it’s your dream client… who is it?

Zegna — I worked on two extremely successful projects for the brand in Dubai and Saudi Arabia, where I developed a strong working relationship with the team.

 

7.       When you’re not at work, where are we most likely to find you?

Now that I am back in Italy, I am enjoying roaming around, taking in the scenery and landscapes — something I really missed while living in Dubai.

 

8.      Which country or city is at the top of your ‘must-visit’ list?

Japan — I have always been fascinated by the culture and architecture.

 

9.       What’s your favourite productivity trick?

I find a good starting point is to put some motivating music on — anything from deep house to classical!

 

10.     How would you describe Agilité Solutions to a relative?

A commercial interiors company with a growing reputation.



11.     As an organisation with sustainability at its heart, Agilité Solutions is dedicated to minimising environmental impact within the construction industry. What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the sector, and how do you think we can rectify it?

Europe, people are becoming increasingly aware of the need to be sustainably conscious — with lots of rules and regulations being brought into effect. My advice would be to adhere to the guidelines and make an effort in all areas of our lives.

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Certification no. 19535

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